Burlingame thumps San Mateo in Little Big Game matchup

In the 91st annual Little Big Game match-up between rivals Burlingame and San Mateo, Burlingame piled up the stats, earning The Paw for the ninth straight year with a 38-7 victory.

Despite a scoreless first quarter, the Panthers racked up five touchdowns over the final three quarters to defeat the Bearcats. Quarterback Jordan Malashus scored a three-yard rushing touchdown on fourth down at the start of the second quarter, giving the Panthers a huge energy shift.

“We had the momentum and it was early in the game. Worst case scenario they stop us and they have a long field to go,” said Burlingame coach John Philipopoulos.

Despite this, the Bearcats silenced the Panthers crowd by recovering a fumble at the Burlingame two-yard line. A punt from the Bearcats' Anthony Villalobos put the Panthers in bad field position, and after the fumble, San Mateo quarterback Luke Bergstrom capitalized on the turnover with a two-yard run for a touchdown.

Although it seemed like it was brewing to be a close game, the Panthers regrouped and scored two more touchdowns before the end of the half. Jordan Malashus put the Panthers back on top with a 16-yard touchdown pass to his brother Devin Malashus, and Curtis Lauti had a two-yard touchdown run with 31 seconds remaining in the second quarter, putting the Panthers in great position at halftime.

“Our guys were moving every single play one-hundred percent. My brother was running down the field catching all the balls I threw, and we were physical every single play,” said Jordan Malashus.

The Malashus brothers had a huge impact in this game with Jordan going 10-of-13 with 128 passing yards and 3 touchdowns, and Devin scoring both a rushing touchdown and a receiving touchdown. Panthers running back Lucas Meredith also padded the stat sheet, putting up 115 rushing yards on the day to help drive the Panthers to their eighth win on the season.

The Panthers scored two more touchdowns and a field goal in the second half, and left the Bearcats scoreless. The Panthers had 333 total yards on the game with 205 rushing yards. The Bearcats were held to 169 total yards, but also found success in the run game, putting up 127 yards.

The Little Big Game was San Mateo's final game of the season, but Burlingame will head into the Central Coast Section playoffs next week. This was a big win for Burlingame, but they still have a lot to look forward to with playoffs coming up.

“The rivalry is part of it but we are trying to win an outright championship, we are trying to continue to work hard and get better for CCS, so we had the rivalry but we have other goals as well,” Philipopoulos said.

Posted on November 7, 2018 .

BHS Alumni host popular Warriors TV show

 BHS grads Drew Schiller (‘05) (left) and Grant Liffman (‘05) enter their second season entertaining fans as the Warriors pursue their consecutive third title.

BHS grads Drew Schiller (‘05) (left) and Grant Liffman (‘05) enter their second season entertaining fans as the Warriors pursue their consecutive third title.

Combining quirkiness, comedy and unrestrained energy into Golden State Warriors analysis, “Warriors Outsiders” has developed a strong fan base among sports fans throughout the Bay Area. As the the Warriors look to defend their Larry O’Brien Trophy, BHS alumni Drew Schiller and Grant Liffman are beginning the second year of their NBC Sports Bay Area show, providing die-hard Warriors fans with insightful observations and light-hearted, free-wheeling entertainment after every game. The longtime friends combine Grant’s Hollywood-bred skills in front of the camera with Drew’s fountain of basketball knowledge while answering their audience’s questions on Facebook to appeal to their youthful viewership.

An illustrious athletic career that included a baseball and football CCS championship, as well as appearances in three straight CCS basketball title games, propelled Schiller into the BHS Athletic Hall of Fame and San Mateo Sports Hall of Fame. After turning down Division 1 football scholarship offers, Schiller chose to attend USF on a basketball scholarship for his freshman season. When a new scholarship opportunity arose, he transferred to his dream school, Stanford, where he played in the backcourt for three years. However, a devastating hip injury prevented Schiller from pursuing a professional playing career overseas. Armed with a competitive spirit and an innate drive to succeed, Schiller was determined to build an off-the-field career out of his love for sports.

A Stanford diploma, strong networking skills and a radiant personality helped Schiller land a job calling Stanford and Santa Cruz Warriors G-League basketball games in November 2010. He soon moved to NBC Sports Bay Area in June 2011 and the fledgling PAC 12 Network during its inaugural year in August 2012. While working on the NBC Sports website in 2016, Schiller collaborated with Liffman to come up with a new project idea.

“We would talk about the Warriors almost daily and we were having a phone conversation one day and he said ‘Hey, man, we should have a show about the Warriors’ and I was like ‘yeah, that would be awesome,’” Schiller said.

After deliberating and negotiating with their superiors at NBC Sports, the friends initially launched the show on Facebook but soon extended it to television as their ratings grew. The idea of two analysts talking about their team while answering questions from viewers on Facebook has caught on, as networks around the country have launched shows such as “Giants Outsiders” and “Blazers Outsiders.”

“It’s cool to see it grow and we obviously care a lot about it and we want it to be successful,” Schiller said.

Considering the Warriors’ recent success (three championships in four years) and a major metropolitan TV market that will consistently provide good TV ratings, the “Outsiders” could easily ride their early wave of success and keep the show exactly the way it is. However, the two former competitive athletes are not inclined to get complacent with their current product.

“You are always looking to grow...you have to be versatile, you have to be able to adapt and do different things, you can’t just be someone who is stuck in their ways. I definitely think that new opportunities will arise and stuff that we can’t even imagine right now we’ll be doing in a couple years,” Schiller said.

Even amidst his current success, Schiller acknowledges how the Burlingame community provided him with endless support as he pursued his endeavors.  

“Burlingame was a tremendous place to grow up and I have nothing but fond memories because of the people,” he said.

Posted on October 31, 2018 .

Football builds on a strong season

Despite a slow start to the season, the football team has regained its footing and is looking ahead to attain its first PAL championship since 2015, when it won the Bay Division. Led by a powerhouse offensive attack that has clicked on all levels, the Panthers picked up two big wins against Half Moon Bay (27-26) and South San Francisco (51-0).

“In the beginning of the season we struggled a little bit to come together but we’ve definitely joined and merged as a team,” cornerback Leo Bashaw said. “I’m feeling confident about our progress so far.”

The Panther offense struggled to find its footing early on, as coach John Philipopoulos experimented with different playcalls and personnel to try to cater to quarterbacks Jordan Malashus and Wyatt McGovern’s unique talents. However, after a loss at Live Oak in week three, Philipopoulos permanently inserted Malashus into the starting role, and the offense took off from there, scoring 49, 27, 51 and 36 points in consecutive games.

On defense, a strong front seven has helped to propel the Panthers to multiple strong outings, including a shutout against South San Francisco.

The Panthers, (6-2 overall and 3-0 in PAL play), are at the top of their division and hope to stay there. After a showdown against fellow frontrunner, The King’s Academy, the Panthers are just 1 game ahead.

“Ultimately we'd like a PAL championship, a CCS championship, but for now we are just going week by week, winning games, doing what we can,” Bashaw said.

The move to the PAL Ocean Division is increasingly looking like a good one, as a division title and CCS playoff berth are well within reach. With a deep senior class led by defensive anchors Noah Lavulo, Dylan Neeley, Scott Atkinson, Curtis Lauti and Youcef Benchohra, the Panthers must capitalize with this talented core or lose a chance to prove the viability of the program.

 Junior quarterback Jordan Malashus lines up against a formidable Half Moon Bay defense.

Junior quarterback Jordan Malashus lines up against a formidable Half Moon Bay defense.

Posted on October 31, 2018 .

91 Years of Rivalry

Each year, students from Burlingame High School and San Mateo High School gather to witness the Little Big Game, the historic matchup between the two schools’ rival football teams. The game, along with other events, highlights the Burlingame-San Mateo rivalry.

 The Burlingame Panthers and the San Mateo Bearcats compete in the 2017 annual Little Big Game.

The Burlingame Panthers and the San Mateo Bearcats compete in the 2017 annual Little Big Game.

This is one of the oldest high school rivalries in the Bay Area. It started back in 1923 when the SMUHSD created the San Mateo High School: Burlingame Branch in order to ease congestion at San Mateo High School, originally located on Baldwin Avenue. The two schools functioned as one, with the same sports teams and band. Eventually, the population of the Burlingame Branch grew to its intended capacity. Four years later, a bond was issued to build a new San Mateo High School, which is the one that still stands today, allowing the Burlingame Branch to be established as a separate school under the name Burlingame High School in 1927.
As soon as the two schools split, the rivalry that has lasted for 91 years started. The first Little Big Game, named after the Cal-Stanford football game, was hosted that year and won by the Panthers 7-6. Throughout the years, thousands of students have been through the halls of San Mateo and Burlingame and taken part in activities relating to the rivalry. Not only is football involved in the Little Big Game, but programs such as cheer, leadership and band are as well.

“The leadership programs bring out their spirit game 100 percent during the games, which makes it a fun time,” San Mateo sophomore Edward Huang said.

San Mateo band director Attilio Tributi has been teaching since 1992, directing the San Mateo Band through 25 Little Big Games.

“The [San Mateo and Burlingame] bands manifest themselves one day a year, during the [Little Big Game],” Tributi said. “I think that the [rivalry] is a fair one and healthy for [the communities] of both schools.”

The next Little Big Game will take place at Burlingame on Saturday Nov. 3 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

“We’re gonna beat them [this year],” Burlingame sophomore Ilan Rosenbaum said.

Be sure to come out and support the Panthers during the game and celebrate 91 years of rivalry.

Posted on October 31, 2018 .

Boys water polo

After an astounding defeat from Menlo-Atherton, the Panthers look to reset during their PAL run. They go into the playoffs tied for third place in the league after earning a record of 3-4.

Roughly three weeks ago, the Panthers ended their pool-hopping around the district and settled on the San Bruno pool for practice.

However, after deeming the pool inadequate, team captains Davor Koprivik and Sebastian Duong, along with senior Jason Schevach tried to find a solution with Principal Paul Belzer, Assistant Principal Markus Autrey and Athletic Director John Philipopoulos on Oct. 4.

“We uncovered an essential flaw in the administration's creation of the schedule,” Shevach said. “[They told] schools that they only had to allow us to practice at their pools until September 26 when the season doesn't end until late October at the earliest.”

Additionally, the date for pool construction has been confirmed to end in December 2019, meaning that next year’s team will have to continue practicing in different pools. However, junior Adrian Cahuana, who plans to continue playing next year, has remained positive about the future.

“I'm kind of sad, because, we don't get our own pool, but I'm actually starting to get used to it,” Cahuana said. “Another year won't really affect me because I'm already getting used to it this year, so it won't be as bad as it could be.”

Cahuana noted that he wasn’t the only one who felt this way, and when asked if sophomores and juniors were losing interest in Water polo, he confirmed that the team was still committed to excellence.

“They just deal with the problem and try to overcome it and just use as much of the time that they're given in the pool. And they want to use it wisely and use every minute and every second to improve.”

Depending whether the Panthers beat Woodside on Oct. 23, their next opponent will be Menlo-Atherton on Thursday, Oct. 26.

 Senior Brandon Pham attempts to pass the ball in his game against Carlmont.

Senior Brandon Pham attempts to pass the ball in his game against Carlmont.

Posted on October 31, 2018 .

Girls junior varsity volleyball succeeds through cultivating confidence

With a record of 13-4, the girls junior varsity volleyball team is wrapping the season up with success. With only two games left to go, the team will work hard in order to win their final game. The team feels confident that it will be able to end the season with one more win.

“Our beginning goal was to improve individually and bond to work together better during games,” sophomore setter Neha Bandrapalli said. The girls stated that they have become close friends throughout the season, which was the reason for their success. Bandrapalli says that they have had many practices which improved their endurance and communication skills significantly.

The team has made great strides toward bonding with one another and strengthening its skills on the court.

“We have bonded so well with each other because we have been winning the games, so it pushes us to want to work harder and become closer as a team,” sophomore setter Camilia Noureddine said.

“At the beginning of the year, we didn’t really feel comfortable with each other, we didn’t have chemistry yet. And now, after spending so much time with each other, I think we really bonded and we’ve made a really good team,” freshman setter Danielle Lewis said. The team’s chemistry has also been good motivation for the team, as each of the players push each other to improve.

“We have improved so much this year as a team because we found a way to bond with each other and we found a way to work with our strengths and combine our weaknesses to limit them,” sophomore libero Madison Kamuller said.

Although they started off struggling to work well, the team has overcome their early season obstacles and finished off strong.

“We want to show off who we are and we want to show how far we’ve come as a team,” Kamuller said.

 Samantha Palacio and Theresa Dakin get ready to return the opponent's serve

Samantha Palacio and Theresa Dakin get ready to return the opponent's serve

Posted on October 31, 2018 .

Girls water polo

Varsity has a record of three wins out of seven overall games, while Junior Varsity has a season record of zero wins in 10 games. The water polo team has endured an entire season without a pool, meaning every practice and game has been away, but it continued to persevere and maintain its Panther pride throughout.

“It was fun in the beginning and through the middle of the season, but now that it's over, there's not many games that we can actually play, because we're not invited to tournaments anymore. And tournaments are the only things that you really improve at,” junior Isabel Downey said.

Tournaments can have three games in one day, and have proven to be a great way for the team to learn and improve. The team has been to two tournaments so far.

“The loss of the pool has led to a lot of tension and having our teammates being mad at us for not knowing stuff that we should because we don't really have the space or time to sit down and talk about all the rules and our game plan and what we should do if something happens,” Downey said.

The team was also shaken up by another change: the hiring of new coaches Dennis Clement and Ariel Dyer. The combination of new coaches and the loss of the pool has led to problems, but nothing unmanageable.

“Our coaches don't know much about the water polo overall district stuff and what's happening. So they don't know how to sign us up for tournaments,” said Downey. “They’re really late in getting the gear, like the t-shirts and the sweatpants. It's going to come in three weeks, but our season ends this week, which kind of sucks.”

With the confusion of always having practices and games at other schools, the team has dealt with losing time and motivation. When they have shown up to other schools to find a game going on or the pool being closed down, the team instead goes out for a spirit-building breakfast or lunch. They have bonded over the fire drills and miscommunications involved in always being the away team, and hope to use this sense of camaraderie next season.

 Junior Alyssa Archie plays defense at Carlmont game.

Junior Alyssa Archie plays defense at Carlmont game.

Posted on October 31, 2018 .

Should football players wear helmets? ... No

Football would be safer without helmets. Now before you put down this article saying the idea is ridiculous or football without helmets would become a “soft” sport, hear me out.

In the 2018 NFL Combine, Giants running back Saquon Barkley ran a 4.40 second 40-yard dash. When converted, that turns out to be an average sprint speed of 18.6 mph. Now, let’s say that when the same player puts his head down into another player’s helmet while running at the same speed and their head rams to a complete stop in one-tenth of a second. That would mean that the given player’s head is subject to a deceleration speed of 90.9 yd/s/s.

According to the Cleveland Clinic’s website, concussions are a result of the brain twisting around and scraping against the skull, leading to damaged brain cells and chemical changes. If anything can cause a big enough jolt to move the brain around inside the skull, it is the impact of two grown men who exceed 200 pounds running directly into each other. To make matters worse, the players feel safe due to the helmets on their heads, and will put their heads down in an attempt to better absorb the impact. In reality, the helmets provide little protection from a concussion due to the fact that the actual damage to the brain comes from the deceleration upon impact.

If helmets were to be eliminated altogether from the game of football, players would no longer have the false sense of the security that they have now. Players would intentionally avoid lowering their heads into other players and instead tackle with their body weight. The ball carriers would also refrain from using their head as a sort of battering ram in favor of relying on evasive speed rather than brute force.

Some people argue that concussions are t as common in rugby as in football, meaning removing helmets would seemingly make no difference in terms of the rate of head injuries. However, when one looks deeper into how concussions actually occur in rugby, it is usually during what is called a scrum, according to the British newspaper, The Telegraph. Scrums are when  players from each team line up, put their heads down and use their necks and heads to push against the other team, which is doing the same thing in the opposite direction. Players are basically required to jam their head into other people, calling for a neck injury or concussion.

In football, scrums do not exist, and the most pressure ever put on a player’s head is when they put it down and try a ram into defenders for extra yards --a type of play that would be avoided if helmets were removed.

Of course, the removal of helmets from the game of football would not make the game safe; that is not possible in a sport where the world’s largest men tackle each other while running at close to 20 miles per hour; it would just greatly decrease the risk of head injury for those playing the game. Football would remain the same in how the game is played, and the only difference from today’s football would be that players would consciously avoid using their heads as battering rams when fighting for yardage.

Posted on October 31, 2018 .

Should football players wear helmets? ... Yes

Football is one of the most dangerous sports played today, specifically due to head to head collisions. According to CNN, there were 291 concussions during the 2017 NFL season. Although there has recently been a movement supporting the removal of football helmets, this would be counterproductive and would drastically increase the already high number of concussions on a yearly basis. Rather, players should focus on better tackling techniques and have helmets as an extra layer of safety.

For starters, there has been an ongoing effort to change the way football players tackle altogether. In 2018, the NFL initiated a series of rule changes in order to prevent not only head to head contact, but lowering the head in general. These rules are extremely strict and can result in ejections and harsh penalties if broken.These rule changes include ejections for head to head contact and penalties for head to body contact, even if it’s incidental. These rules prohibit players from lowering their heads at all during a hit, meaning players wouldn’t even think about lowering their head to absorb the impact or hit harder; the risk of penalties or ejection is not worth the reward. Therefore, the number of players lowering their head to hit would be the same, with a helmet or without. The extra level of safety that a helmet provides becomes a safety measure, rather than a tool to exploit.

In addition to new rules, coaching at all levels of the game encourages safer hitting techniques. From peewee to the NFL, coaches are teaching the right way to hit: head up, use your shoulders and avoid hitting the opponent’s head. If kids are taught at a young age to hit correctly, they will keep themselves out of harm’s way. Players wear helmets for a reason, and taking them away will not cause them to lower their head less; they are already taught proper tackling form. As BHS varsity cornerback Leo Bashaw puts it, “players are taught to keep their heads out of the equation when tackling regardless.”

Lastly, there is only so much a player can control. At some point, heads are going to hit, whether it be other heads, bodies, or the ground. If players are not wearing helmets, those hits turn from small injuries into devastating head trauma. For example, in week two of the NFL, Taiwan Jones was hit without a helmet, and it resulted in a brutal head injury. Although Jones had lost his helmet during the play, the result is the same: helmets provide an important level of protection against accidental hits to the head. Players could accidentally hit heads or smack against the ground, and without helmets, the injuries would be much worse.

Overall, the NFL would be much less safe without helmets. Players are already transitioning to safer tackling techniques, and soon head to head contact will be essentially eradicated. Helmets should be utilized as an insurance policy, and should be used as a backup to already-safe tackling techniques. The risk of not wearing helmets is too great, and instead of taking them out we should focus on new technology that makes helmets as safe as possible.


Posted on October 31, 2018 .

Golf season winds down after long season

Burlingame’s last game was on Thursday, Oct. 11 at the Poplar Creek Golf Course against Mills. As the season comes to a close, the Panthers hold a 3-9 record, with two wins against Mills and one against Hillsdale.

“[The season] was good for losing a lot of good seniors,” junior Sophia Palacio said.

Over the past two months, the Panthers have gained lots of experience, playing many games with local schools such as Aragon, San Mateo, Carlmont and Menlo-Atherton. The season has brought Burlingame all over the Bay Area, including the Sharon Heights Golf & Country Club to the San Jose Country Club.

“[The season] was really fun and we learned a lot from our coach,” sophomore Francesca Flowers said.

However, the team may face similar problems next year, as multiple seniors will be graduating, according to Flowers. The next season will call for the younger members to step up their game.

Girls golf will restart next fall.

 Burlingame Junior Sophia Palacio prepares to hit the golf ball in Burlingame's last game of the season.

Burlingame Junior Sophia Palacio prepares to hit the golf ball in Burlingame's last game of the season.

Posted on October 27, 2018 .

Girls Tennis draws closer to finals

Although the Burlingame girls varsity tennis team was losing their October 9 match against Carlmont, one wouldn’t know it from the spirit and positivity emanating off the team. After losing her first set, sophomore Vedika Bhaumik took a water break; not showing dismay over her loss but instead discussing what she could improve on in the following game with her coach, keeping in mind strengths and weaknesses. Bhaumik says that “I tend to hit all these aggressive shots that never make it over the net,” and wants to focus on improving this as the season continues but thinks that “my strengths are my serves, they have gotten exponentially better throughout the season.”

At the beginning of the season, sophomore Olina Du stated, “it’s definitely really exciting, as we have a lot of new freshmen this year to fill the empty spots of the seniors. I’m excited to see how the season will go with these new freshmen.” Du’s excitement was met with the phenomenal chemistry of the team. As this season has progressed, the team has formed closer bonds with one another and have learned to improve together. Sophomore Elisabeth Weimar states that “overall, this group has a really good morale. We always encourage each other and we really want each other to succeed.” Bhaumik builds off of Weimar’s thoughts, saying that “there’s no conflict between upperclassmen and lowerclassmen. Everyone is just very inclusive.”

With only eight games left in the season, Weimar is also feeling hopeful about the rest of the games and says that “as the season has progressed we’ve gotten stronger and I think definitely we have a chance of going further in the finals than we did last year… if we win the next couple of games we’ll be able to make it to the playoffs.” Bhaumik supports this and says that “we‘ve had our ups and downs but I think that overall as a team we’ve bonded pretty well and with the new players coming in I think there’s a lot of hope for the future.” The team plans to take this confidence and excitement with them into the finals.

Overall, as the team draws nearer to finals, they are excited and also nervous. As a whole, they have improved on not only their tennis skills, but also have created and strengthened their bonds with one another. The team has learned to grow together and hopes to carry their confidence with them through their next few games.

 Freshman Annika Ganguly prepares to return a serve in Burlingame's game against Half Moon Bay.

Freshman Annika Ganguly prepares to return a serve in Burlingame's game against Half Moon Bay.

Posted on October 24, 2018 .

Cross Country

It’s been business as usual for the cross country team, which has run three meets thus far and is preparing for the Peninsula Athletic League (PAL) championships. The team has been practicing five times per week, and has maintained its laid-back ethos, going on food runs every Monday.

The Crystal Springs Invitational meet, which took place Oct. 6, was a highlight of the season, as juniors Brendan Creeks and Livvy Van Hamel Platerink and sophomore Aaron Becker all ran personal best times on the course, where they had run numerous times before.


“It was probably the most competitive meet we’ve ever been to,” Creeks said. “Everyone that went ran a pr there.”


Van Hamel Platerink, who left the tennis team to join cross country this year, performed especially well at the meet, and is glad she made the decision to switch sports.  


“Everyone’s been really supportive,” she said. “It’s been pretty awesome.”


The team will run one more league meet at the Crystal Springs course on Oct. 26 before wrapping up the season with the PAL championships Nov. 3 on the same course.

“We’re just trying to stay healthy right now to get ready for PALs,” said head coach Steve O’Brien.


Until then, the team will continue to train and enjoy cross country.


“I just love running with the boys,” Creeks said.

 Head coach Steve O’Brien delivers an impassioned speech to the cross country team.

Head coach Steve O’Brien delivers an impassioned speech to the cross country team.

Posted on October 24, 2018 .

Varsity Cheer

 Varsity Cheer keeps a watchful eye on the field during the Varsity Football against Half Moon Bay on September 21st.

Varsity Cheer keeps a watchful eye on the field during the Varsity Football against Half Moon Bay on September 21st.

 The cheer squad performs their halftime show in order to excite the crowd at the third home game of the season.

The cheer squad performs their halftime show in order to excite the crowd at the third home game of the season.

 Varsity Cheer Captain Gracy Burdick leads the rest of the Varsity squad in their newest routine.

Varsity Cheer Captain Gracy Burdick leads the rest of the Varsity squad in their newest routine.

 Fliers Hanna Schweinberg, Brianna Castro and Tyler Alhorn perform a complex set of stunts during their halftime rountine.

Fliers Hanna Schweinberg, Brianna Castro and Tyler Alhorn perform a complex set of stunts during their halftime rountine.

 The cheerleaders perform their touchdown dance after the Panthers score another touchdown.

The cheerleaders perform their touchdown dance after the Panthers score another touchdown.

Posted on October 15, 2018 .

CCS Football

 Sophomore quarteback Wyatt Mcgovern hands the ball of to Lucas Meredith prior to Burlingame’s dismantling of Alvarez High School.

Sophomore quarteback Wyatt Mcgovern hands the ball of to Lucas Meredith prior to Burlingame’s dismantling of Alvarez High School.

 Burlingame running back Curtis Lauti breaks past the secondary for a 61 yard touchdown run against Alvarez.

Burlingame running back Curtis Lauti breaks past the secondary for a 61 yard touchdown run against Alvarez.

 William Moffit runs drills with his Half Moon Bay offense in preperation for its showdown with a strong San Mateo defense.

William Moffit runs drills with his Half Moon Bay offense in preperation for its showdown with a strong San Mateo defense.

 Half Moon Bay’s Nohea Sharp turns the corner in drills before the game against San Mateo.

Half Moon Bay’s Nohea Sharp turns the corner in drills before the game against San Mateo.

 The San Mateo football team runs back to its bench for the final pregame huddle.

The San Mateo football team runs back to its bench for the final pregame huddle.

 Menlo Atherton pounded out over 300 yards on the ground during their game against Aragon.

Menlo Atherton pounded out over 300 yards on the ground during their game against Aragon.

Posted on October 15, 2018 .

Cross Country

 Cross country athletes are all business while running. Once the grind starts, it does not stop.

Cross country athletes are all business while running. Once the grind starts, it does not stop.

 Head coach Steve O'Brien delivers an impassioned motivational speech the day before a meet in Pacifica.

Head coach Steve O'Brien delivers an impassioned motivational speech the day before a meet in Pacifica.

 Brendan Creeks and Ben Neuman push each other as they blast through Washington Park.

Brendan Creeks and Ben Neuman push each other as they blast through Washington Park.

 Cooper Glavin looks like he is in pain, and that is because he is. For Glavin, every day is a test of the boundaries of the human body.

Cooper Glavin looks like he is in pain, and that is because he is. For Glavin, every day is a test of the boundaries of the human body.

Posted on October 11, 2018 .

Girls varsity volleyball

 Senior Melanie Pitzer jumps up to spike the ball.

Senior Melanie Pitzer jumps up to spike the ball.

 Senior Caroline Smith serves overhand towards the Westmoor High School team.

Senior Caroline Smith serves overhand towards the Westmoor High School team.

 Pitzer kneels to bump the volleyball after a serve from Westmoor.

Pitzer kneels to bump the volleyball after a serve from Westmoor.

 Senior Kyra Franco executes an overhand serve.

Senior Kyra Franco executes an overhand serve.

 Senior Alexandra Edwards sets the volleyball while teammate Julia Everson, also a senior, prepares to spike the ball over the net.

Senior Alexandra Edwards sets the volleyball while teammate Julia Everson, also a senior, prepares to spike the ball over the net.

Posted on October 11, 2018 .

Boys water polo

 Senior Andre Dintcho shoots the ball in a game against Hillsdale.

Senior Andre Dintcho shoots the ball in a game against Hillsdale.

 Senior Lucca Aliaga passes the ball in the Panthers' game against Menlo Atherton

Senior Lucca Aliaga passes the ball in the Panthers' game against Menlo Atherton

 Senior Fenn Jones passes the ball during the Panthers' senior night at Hillsdale High School.

Senior Fenn Jones passes the ball during the Panthers' senior night at Hillsdale High School.

 Junior Mason Rossi shoots the ball during a game against Menlo Atherton

Junior Mason Rossi shoots the ball during a game against Menlo Atherton

Posted on October 9, 2018 .

Girls water polo

 Junior Michele Tam grabs the ball as Carlmont player races towards her.

Junior Michele Tam grabs the ball as Carlmont player races towards her.

 Coaches Clement and Dyer give Varsity words of encouragement during half-time.

Coaches Clement and Dyer give Varsity words of encouragement during half-time.

 Junior Isabel Downey plays defense against Carlmont player

Junior Isabel Downey plays defense against Carlmont player

 Senior Ava Jordan grasps the ball in the final seconds of the game.

Senior Ava Jordan grasps the ball in the final seconds of the game.

 Varsity player Alyssa Archie tenaciously defends the ball at Carlmont game.

Varsity player Alyssa Archie tenaciously defends the ball at Carlmont game.

Posted on October 9, 2018 .

Burlingame looks to dominate PAL Ocean Division

With a 3-2 record entering the bye week, the Panther varsity football team looks confident and ready to make a statement in the local high school football scene. After a decisive opening night blowout win over Alvarez (San Jose), the Panthers competed well against a tough Sacred Heart Prep (Atherton) team in a tight Week 2 road contest. However, disappointing mental mistakes on offense and defense proved costly, as SHP squeaked out a victory despite a superb defensive performance headed by Dylan Neeley and Noah Lavulo. Facing a beatable Live Oak (Morgan Hill) team, the BHS offense looked sloppy, discombobulated and inexperienced, surrendering numerous turnovers from which they could not recover. Desperately needing a win to build momentum before league play, the Panthers kicked it into high gear against Watsonville, crushing the Wildcats 49-7. Last Friday, the Panthers showed toughness and poise by staving off a pesky Half Moon Bay team a year removed from a Division 3 CIF State title game appearance. Despite losing star running back Curtis Lauti to a knee injury, the Panthers rode three Luke Meredith touchdowns to a 27-26 victory. A talented senior class and strong front 7 will help the Panthers contend for an Ocean Division title and provide plenty of entertainment for BHS football fans.

After losing multiple important contributors from the 2017 campaign, including quarterback Carlo Lopiccolo, Linebacker John Dryden, and running back Alec Meredith, the Panthers began the 2018 season with considerably less talent across the board than previous seasons. When asked about the mass exodus of players away from the sport of football, Coach P noted the physical difficulties and time commitment associated with the sport. “I think health risks are a part of it, I think a changing demographic in the area is part of it, I think that football is hard and it’s a big commitment and committing to that level isn’t always a top priority for students,” explained Coach P before the Week 3 matchup against Live Oak.

Although they return talented athletes in Youcef Benchohra, Curtis Lauti, Neeley, and Lavulo, the rest of the roster consistently looks physically overmatched. Coach P has attempted to overcome his offensive line’s physical limitations by running the wing-t offense, a scheme he says is characterized by linemen “pulling and kicking people out.” The run-heavy offense “lends to undersized-type linemen” and allows the Panthers to not have to block head-on. By running a lot of misdirection runs to deceive the defense, the Panthers effectively set up the play-action, which is well-suited to their ultra-mobile junior quarterback, Jordan Malashus.

With his speed and gut instinct, Malashus doesn’t need a clean pocket to make plays and excels at creating opportunities when plays break down. However, the most vital part of the offense is the play of the three halfbacks lined up behind Malashus - Sophomore Luke Meredith and Seniors Lauti and Benchora - who have already combined for more than 500 rushing yards. Once the ground game gets going, the Panthers control the tempo of the game by staging long drives that eat up the clock, as they did against Alvarez and SHP. After using a run-first approach for more than 20 years, Philipopoulos likely will continue to do so well into the future, especially considering the bevy of talent he has at his disposal.

Defensively, the front 7 has impressed with a nightmarish pass rush and fantastic run-stopping ability. With Benchohra and Neeley manning the defensive end positions, Jack Martinelli and Lavulo playing defensive tackle, and Lauti, Scottie Atkinson, and Ibrahim Yaldiz at linebacker, the Panthers have terrified opposing offenses up front. Even after losing their entire 2017 starting secondary to graduation, the Panthers’ ferocious pass rush has helped the young secondary by harassing opposing quarterbacks and forcing them to throw the ball quickly. Coach P went so far as to say that Benchora and Neeley “might be the best combination of defensive ends we’ve ever had here” and that Lavulo has “clearly been one of the better defensive tackles on the Peninsula; he could start at any school on the Peninsula.”

Neeley’s stellar play up front has led college coaches to take notice. Without providing specifics, Philipopoulos noted that “there are a few schools out there that are kind of keeping an eye on Dylan.” If he ends up playing Division 1 college football, Neeley would be the first Panther since Benji Palu (UC Berkeley) to play at such a high level.

Returning to the prominence of the 2003 CCS championship team or the 2013 CCS Division 3 number-1 seeded team is a long shot, but an Ocean Division title will put Burlingame on everyone’s radar around the Peninsula.

 Noah Lavulo (54) and the Panthers are pushing towards a CCS playoff berth.

Noah Lavulo (54) and the Panthers are pushing towards a CCS playoff berth.

Posted on September 29, 2018 .

Varsity cheer

This year, cheer is continuing to work hard to boost spirit and morale at BHS. The junior varsity and varsity teams are also working together to prepare for the Little Big Game on Nov. 3 in addition to all of their weekly football games.

“I’m excited for learning more complex stunting and choreography. I’m also excited about getting closer with cheer friends and having fun again this year,” junior Julia Doherty said. The cheerleading squad makes new routines every 2 weeks and change stunting continuously in preparation for the football games.

Cheer recruited several new members this year, making the cheer squad one of the largest in years, at more than 45 cheerleaders. Junior varsity is also now a co-ed team for the first time in more than 10 years, led by Katlyn Tran and Esha . The varsity squad is led by Ella Escobar and Pia Esguerra.

In addition to football games, the team is working to prepare for and plan the annual homecoming dance following the Little Big Game.

 The Varsity Cheer Squad performs their halftime show at the BHS versus Half Moon Bay football game on September 21.

The Varsity Cheer Squad performs their halftime show at the BHS versus Half Moon Bay football game on September 21.

Posted on September 29, 2018 .