“Ok Boomer” fuels a generational war

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“Ok Boomer” fuels a generational war

Nicole Fassina, Staff Reporter

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For so long, Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964) and Millenials (born 1997+) have been “at war” with each other, especially on issues relating to the economy, climate change, LGBTQ rights and other social issues. 

But in the past month, the term “Ok Boomer” has taken the internet by storm. And this time it’s Generation Z that is calling out Baby Boomers. 

What started out as a harmless joke on social media platforms such as Tik Tok and Instagram has rapidly become a controversy and a beginning to a new generational war.

The young mocking the old is nothing new; this type of banter has been around forever. But the “Ok Boomer” phrase is so much more than just a joke. This simple two-word phrase is a symbol of the collective exhaustion of multiple generations that seem to have inherited the problems caused by the older generations. 

What people aren’t seeing is that this “Ok Boomer” meme isn’t a joke. It’s actual real criticism that shouldn’t be taken seriously. It’s intended to get Boomers to pay attention and take action on real pressing world matters, instead of constantly slandering the youth for being “lazy” and “childish.” 

Disparaging the young has always been apart of human history, but Gen Z’ers have had enough. They want action and real change. And they want it now. They are tired of not being taken seriously by their predecessors. 

There’s nothing wrong with this meme. In fact, it’s pretty funny. But if you are a millennial or Gen Z who is about to say “Ok Boomer,” instead go register to vote, raise awareness to political issues that you care about or take the action you want to see from others. Don’t criticize others for things you don’t do yourself. 

And if you’re a Baby Boomer getting offended by an internet meme, let it serve as a reminder to stop shaming and complaning about younger generations. Instead, learn to have a conversation with the youth about current world issues, and you’ll find that they actually have a lot to say. 

Real change will only come once we end this multigenerational divide.